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From ‘Shining’ To ‘2001’: The Color Theory of Stanley Kubrick

YouTube: StudioBinder

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From ‘Shining’ To ‘2001’: The Color Theory of Stanley Kubrick

Behold the visual feasts of a master filmmaker.

Stanley Kubrick is a true master filmmaker. He’s in rare company when it comes to the overall quality and composition of his entire filmography, alongside the likes of Hitchcock, Scorsese, Spielberg, Kurosawa, Fellini, Lumet, and Tarkovski, to name a few. An argument can certainly be made that Kubrick even stands out among these aforementioned legends of the moving image trade.

Kubrick is what many consider a mad genius, pushing the boundaries of filmmaking beyond what others thought possible. He was known for his insanely thorough research before production begins, then shooting a crazy number of takes for each scene, sometimes 50, 60, or more for reasons that weren’t totally clear to the actors.

This process of his resulted in some of the greatest films ever made. But if we were to drill down to more specific components of his filmmaking style–or perhaps a better way to describe it is his craft–color theory is certain one of the more critical aspects dictating the aesthetic and overall effectiveness of his films.

Color is essential to the mise en scene of a movie, with a direct and powerful impact on the overall effect of each shot. It’s an essential tool in visual storytelling.

Kubrick understood this notion more than most, and used it to his advantage. Want to see how (and discover a whole lot more about Kubrick’s films that you may not have ever recognized before)? Be sure to check out the video by the superb folks at Studio Binder.

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