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‘Get Out’ Is Just As Brilliant 4 Years Later

Get Out Daniel Kaluuya
Universal Pictures

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‘Get Out’ Is Just As Brilliant 4 Years Later

Jordan Peele‘s directorial debut, “Get Out,” hit theaters on February 24, 2017. I remember a buddy of mine raving about the film the following Monday. “You’ve got to see it, man” he said, “It’s the best movie I’ve ever seen.”

I was reluctant. A horror film released in February? There’s no way “Get Out” could live up to the hype. Boy was I wrong.

Get Out” is a flawless movie. Peele is able to pack every frame with incredible amounts of symbolism and meaning. Peele’s introduction of the film’s two main characters perfectly sets up the incredible attention to detail that resides throughout “Get Out.”

*Spoilers ahead*

“Get Out” Title Sequence

Childish Gambino‘s song “Redbone” plays over the film’s title sequence. As we are introduced to our protagonist, Chris Washington, Gambino’s lyrics of “stay woke” warn us of what is to come. The footage of Chris is intercut with footage of his girlfriend, Rose. As Chris gets ready for the day, Rose picks out breakfast pastries on her way to his apartment.

While on a first watch the act of Rose buying Chris breakfast is cute, closer interpretation reveals Rose’s sinister nature. As Rose glances at the pastries her eye-line reveals what she is truly looking at. She purposefully bent down to get the attention of the man behind her. Rose watches the man in the reflection of the glass and when he moves, her eyes follow. Then she smiles. Her plan is working. She’s lining up her next victim.

Gambino sings “They gon’ find you / Gon’ catch you sleepin” as Rose makes her way closer and closer to Chris’ apartment. The lines “They gon’ find you” are repeated as Chris and Rose kiss and she enters his apartment. It’s too late, Chris has already been trapped.

From the opening title sequence, Peele’s utilization of image and sound is one of the best I’ve ever seen. And he did it all without one line of dialogue. Peele sets up the tone, theme and twist all while simultaneously introducing the film’s two main characters.

“Get Out” packs in an incredible amount of detail in under two minutes within the films second sequence. This film is a masterpiece from the start. Check out the title sequence below and give “Get Out” a rewatch for its 4th birthday.

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